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Justicehttp://greatmomentsinparenting.com/moments/a-simple-trick-one-dividesone-chooses/

IMG_1768I’ve been traveling on business a lot lately, which means I’ve been spending a lot of time finding my way through airports and figuring out menus in restaurants.  Every airport situation is different – but traveling through them involves a very specific and common set of solutions – find your flight, determine your gate, go through security, get some coffee, and wait to board.  It’s a process, with which I am familiar – just like going to the market, or eating in a restaurant, or visiting the pediatrician.

Something that I continue to notice on this trip is how totally consistent little children are.  No matter where I’ve been – London, Oslo, Munich, Hamburg, Lviv (in the Ukraine), or even L.A., it doesn’t matter how up-tight or logistically focused their parents may be, kids just seem to be dancing, singing, and passing the time in their own little wonderful world.

Mother And Baby At Airport.It is heartwarming to know that kids all over the world seem to be essentially the same.  For toddlers, everything is fascinating.  People bustle by, a cell phone rings, a big person is plays peek-a-boo – so much action, so much distraction…their heads swing around from sudden interest to studied stare.  It’s truly a pleasure to watch as they interact with the world and soak in new things.

As a parent, what’s clearest to me is how their unbridled curiosity and playfulness makes them completely dependent on us to protect and to guide them.  We are, after all, the people who make them safe – upon whose presence they can depend so that they can drift through their day soaking up one experience after another.  This means that we’re the ones who know our way around an airport, who know where to get food, who know where the bathrooms are, etc. etc.  Most importantly, even if we don’t know our way around, we know how to read the signs and use the tools we have to be able to solve those problems.  We have been through the process.  Our life experience is what makes us qualified to be parents…and it’s what our kids are counting on.

ChildAirportWDadThe same is true for our children at home.  As much as we might believe they know what we might expect, or that they appear to “want to do it themselves”, we are the ones who know best.  Communicating this – whether it’s about bedtime, diet, hygiene, or courtesy, lets our children know that we have answers – that if they stick with us (as they must at the airport) they will be protected by our knowledge and hopefully, good nature.  It is in this way that they learn the process from us.

Letting children make their own rules is not doing them a favor.  Imagine one of those toddlers wandering around the airport – hungry, tired, in need of a bathroom – how would she find her way?  Most likely she’d be crying for her mommy or daddy because she doesn’t know the process and doesn’t know what to do.  When mommy or daddy arrive, this little girl isn’t going to check their qualifications – she’s just going to be happy to see the person (or people) who can offer her the security of knowing.

DFW TaxiIf you got into a cab and the driver admitted being lost, you wouldn’t have a very comfortable or relaxed ride – would you?  Now imagine that your kids are in your cab – and remember that you need to believe you know the process and behave as though you know exactly where you’re going so that they can, while buckled into their seats, relax and continue soaking up the world around them.

Raising children is just like being at  the airport – it changes all the time, but you’ve been there before and you can figure it out.

Essentially, if you have a plan, and you know what your values are, you can stay calm and never need to get overexcited in the first place.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/david-vienna/latest-parenting-trend-ctfd-method_b_3588031.html?utm_hp_ref=email_share

ignoranceinactionMy mother had a poster by her favorite chair.  It read, “There is nothing more frightful than ignorance in action.” – Goethe

It appears that, despite proven facts (as opposed to other facts), Jenny McCarthy continues to believe that vaccinations are bad for our children… I wonder how she feels about Polio?

http://www.cnn.com/2013/07/17/opinion/perry-jenny-mccarthy-autism/index.html?hpt=hp_t4

RaisingChildrenFinalFrontCvrWebWe are days away from the release of my book, so I thought I’d share a little more…

Everyone is capable of creating a wonderful family, and “Raising Children That Other People Like to be Around” is structured around five simple principles for which I have had the audacity to create the anagram “S.M.A.R.T.”  There are five letters so that they can be counted on one hand, and I used the word SMART because it’s positive and easy to remember.  The principles are the most important behaviors that influence the way our children see us – and, as they become adults, the way they see themselves.

As parents, our job is to:

Set an example.

Make the rules.

Apply the rules.

Respect ourselves.

Teach in all things.

Children make us life-long learners – not only by sharing the events of their lives, but also by keeping us in touch with ourselves, the things we believe in, and the ways we react to those events.

The book describes a process, referencing anecdotal information that affirms or teaches a specific lesson, regardless of the age of the child.  There is no doubt that many of our children’s adult strengths are the result of lessons learned when they were toddlers.  With some solid concentration in the first few years, you can set yourself up for a very pleasurable life-long parenting experience.  After all, if you pour the right foundation, and create some solid scaffolding, the buildings you build are going to stand up to almost any storm.

“We made them from scratch,” we say to each other, and this book is the closest I can come to giving you our recipe.

Em's GraduationFor JoAnn and me, it sometimes seems as though every minute we have is devoted to our children. But after all the teacher conferences, sporting events, carpooling, and homework supervising, the loving memories seem too fleeting.  As we look back on all those years, we can barely remember many of the details because, as JoAnn says, “The days crawl, and the years fly by.”

 

June has been an excellent month.

emorylogoFirst, our daughter Emily was admitted to Emory University, her first choice.  She got the news not by email or snail, but by phone from an actual human. Southern hospitality!

RaisingChildrenFinalFrontCvrWebNext, I’ve approved the publication draft of my book Raising Children That Other People Like to be Around:  Five Common-Sense Musts From a Father’s Point of View.  Now the cover art can be completed and I’ll have physical copies of the book very soon.  I’ve posted the just-completed cover here to showcase the talent of my wonderful artist, Cynthia Jacquette.

In the meantime I’ll be using this site to share insights from the book and to address the pleasures and pains of parenting.  So please stay tuned and for candid thoughts and updates please follow me as commonsensedad on Twitter.