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Our son Ben recently called and said “We’re pregnant!”  JoAnn, my wife, was very quick to point out that Ben’s wife, Kelsie is pregnant and that they are having a baby.  After all, JoAnn asks, “Is Ben nauseous all the time?” “Are his ankles swollen?” “Is he constantly overheated?”

Well… no.

bkg nose pick

Ben – Expectant Father

Of course our son will never actually “be” pregnant, but it’s clear that this generation of fathers is being encouraged to share in the process and, to the extent that sharing “ownership” of the pregnancy seems kind of appropriate to me, I’m pleased to see Ben stepping up to the job.

I understand Ben’s desire to be included and I understand his wanting to take his share of the responsibility for the gestation that’s going on. I was an active father during JoAnn’s pregnancies (for our era).  No matter the hour, I forced myself to go get ice-cream, I consoled her when she was crying for no reason, and I understood the importance of remaining firm, supportive, and flexible.

Through four pregnancies I often joked “If I could carry that baby… I would!”  – which probably got old.

BoysAdmireBabyEm

Emily arrives!

To her credit, JoAnn never complained about me or the process.  I believe her positive and loving attitude helped define the cheerful nature of our children today. At this point, I don’t think either of us really cares “who” is pregnant – as much as we’re elated that Kelsie is!

Of course, we’re now involved in a different type of sweepstakes…

MyGrandma

My Grandma

…Grandparenting!

What will this baby call us? We’re working on it, because, after all, this is precedent setting, a high stakes decision that will define how our future grandchildren will know and love us. Our children knew their Grandparents as Nana and Poppie (JoAnn’s side) and Grandma and Grandpa (my side) – so those names are out. Various suggestions have been made (by people other than Ben and Kelsie) – like Gammy Jo and Don Ricardo, or Slick and JayJay. We’re open to suggestions.

A lot of our friends are already grandparents. They do a lot of babysitting and some of them do it every day. I’m not sure we’re going to be so “hands on,” but one thing is for sure, we’re entering a new phase where some little creature is going to capture our hearts and cause us to lose our minds. Neither JoAnn’s nor my parents were much for watching the grandkids.

JGGCornChip

Their Grandmother

My mother stepped in once in a while, but not on a regular basis. She was confident though, and that was good. One time, she was watching our oldest son, Aaron, and we phoned to see if everything was going alright. “If you trust the babysitter, you need not phone.” she replied tersely. The witness was asleep when we picked him up.

Grandma had made her point.

NathanWCar

My Mother’s Father

Although I don’t really remember my grandparents that well, they are legends in my mind (and the family lore). My father’s father opened the first children’s shoe store in L.A. My mother’s father was an immigrant blacksmith and inventor who sued Henry Ford (and won). I never met my mother’s mother (she died when my mother was three). My father’s mother and I were cordial – but it’s not like I remember her hugging me to pieces (as I anticipate I will do with our grandchildren).

Now I have to think about what my legacy will be? How will my grandchildren (and the family lore) describe me? Will I be the nut-bar grandpa who is remembered for playing the bass drum in a local marching band? Will I be the grandpa who never grew up and shamelessly burst into song whenever possible? Perhaps my most important legacy will be the one I share with JoAnn – that our children’s children will know that their grandparents prioritized their love, that they were in love from the start and stayed that way.

Family

These people.

What I can say is this:  We will be parents who support our children in their efforts to raise respectful and kind children. We will also expect our grandchildren to have good manners and to behave within our expectations. We will be calm. We will counsel our children with understanding and we will encourage them to use their instincts when making parenting decisions. We will help them when we can – and we will do so without adding strings (something my mother selflessly taught us).  We will help them keep their feet on the ground and their heads on their shoulders, and we will laugh with them as they learn to navigate the pathways of parenting.

Yes, this is going to be an adventure, and we can’t wait.

MarcieNKids1954cuOur own life experience is our greatest parenting resource.  In my book, Raising Children That Other People Like to be Around”, I suggest that parenting is like driving a cab: if you don’t at least ACT like you know the way, your passengers (children) are going to be nervous and uncomfortable as you would be with a rookie cab driver.

But how can new parents proceed with confidence?  By looking backward at the way they themselves were parented.

All of us are influenced by what Selma Frieberg, author of The Magic Years, called the “Ghosts in our Nursery” – essentially, the voices of those who raised us.  Learning to recognize how our parents influenced us may be the most effective way of preparing for the job ahead.  What did your parents do that you remember most positively?  Were there hugs at night?  Surprise trips to the ice cream store?  Goofy family photos? What makes these events so memorable?

dunce in cornerWhat do you remember that was negative?  Was it discipline with a belt, or friendly persuasion?  Was it time in isolation?  Was it “no dessert”?  Did your parents explain their motives, or just make you frustrated and angry with them?  How can you avoid repeating those mistakes with your own children?

I put together some simple questions for you to ask your spouse, parenting partner, or co-parent, in order to better understand the emotional land mines that you might encounter. Use these questions to help you clarify the values, vision, and goals that will define the system you apply as you define your family.  These questions should help you narrow down your parenting objectives and unify your message.  They are of value no matter how old your children may be.

  • What did/do you love most about your father?  Your mother?
  • Did you know your grandparents?  What do or did you love  / remember most about them?
  • In what ways do you think your parents are like their parents?  In what ways do you think they are different?
  • Were your parents always honest with you?  Did they always tell you the truth?
  • What do you think were your parent’s biggest mistakes?  Successes?
  • At what moment were you proudest to be the child of your father / mother?
  • At what moment were you most embarrassed by your father / mother?  Would you be just as embarrassed today? (Do you feel embarrassed just thinking about it?  If so, feel the power of this memory!)
  • Do you remember whether or not your mother was always busy?  Was your father?
  • Which or your behaviors did your parents punish most severely?  Do you agree with their decisions?
  • What behaviors did they encourage?  Will you encourage the same ones?
  • How did your parents let you know they loved you?  Will you (or do you) do the same with your children?
  • Did you ever really disappoint your parents?  How?  How did that behavior affect the way they treated you?  How did your behavior or self-image change as a result?
  • When did you most feel loved?  Why?
  • Did your family have any rituals / holidays / quirks?  What was your role in them?  How did your parents handle them?  Were they the leaders?  Did they ever let you lead?  How did you feel about that?
  • Who is your favorite relative?  Why?
  • Who is your favorite parenting role model?  Why?
  • What is your greatest fear about being a parent?

couple-talkingCuteAlthough I originally created this as a one-time organizational tool, I have learned that part of a successful parenting system is the regular recalibration of messages and techniques. The values you define from this lesson can be the foundation you fall back on, year after year, as you build the “emotional scaffolding” inside your children.

Consider these the rules of the sport that your team will be playing.  As managers, you and your partner will have to remember to watch game films at regular intervals, to review the day, to change the plan, to hold a mirror up to each other to see if you’re both still on track.  If you desire, document your conclusions after reading the questionnaire and check them every once in a while to see if you’re still on course.  Are you avoiding the behaviors you disliked in your parents?  Are you being positive with your children?  Are you communicating and reflecting your thoughts regularly with your mate?

couple-talking-moneyKeeping these resolutions in mind will make the process quicker and easier than having to always start at scratch.  Remember, parenting is a practice, it evolves, and lessons are taught to us every day.  The more we do it, the more we reflect and share, the easier it becomes – and the more proficient WE become.  Sharing and defining those lessons is one of the keys to staying on course.

We all have our own stories — and, to me, everyone’s story is interesting.  Essentially, these questions ask, “What makes you who you are?”   Think of your own questions and add them to the list.  Then decide, from this discussion, how you’re going to communicate, how you’re going to strengthen each other’s confessed weaknesses, and protect each other from your fears (JoAnn and I came up with “key words” to let each other know that we’d fallen off course).  Remember those resolutions, and use them as your litmus test when you regularly recalibrate.

DecaturStoreGreenbergsNot everything our parents did was right or wrong. How we raise your children is finally and entirely up to us – but starting with our past is a good way to build a value system, recognize our strengths, and move forward with confidence.

LEFT – The Greenberg Bros. store.  Decatur Ill.  1911